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German Studies, Cornell University

Cornell University Department of German Studies Cornell Univeristy

Fall 2010

Circular Plate Rolling on a Cone

Graduate Courses - Fall 2010


GERST 6131 GERMAN PHILOSOPHICAL TEXTS (also PHIL 6030)
1-4 credits.
    TBA, M. Kosch
Reading, translation, and English-language discussion of important texts in the German philosophical tradition.  Readings for a given term are chosen in consultation with students.  Prerequisites: Basic
reading (not necessarily speaking) knowledge of German, and the permission of the instructor.

GERST 6470 POST-WAR, POST-MODERNITY, POST-HISTORY: LITERATURE IN GERMAN FROM 1945 TO THE PRESENT

4 credits.  Prerequisite: reading knowledge of German.
    R 2:30-4:25, P. Gilgen
This seminar/anchor course will focus on German literature during the immediate aftermath of World War II, the period of the Cold War between 1949 and 1989, and the period from the fall of the Wall to the present.  The point of the course will be to trace major themes and styles in German-speaking literature in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland in light of contemporaneous events of broad cultural and political significance.  Individual texts will be examined in detail within their specific aesthetic, historical, and geopolitical contexts.  The course will be organized comparatively around critical debates concerning such topics as: the social function of literature; programs and theories of literature; fictional representations of the immediate past; attempts by minority/majority voices to challenge and change the canon; writing and social change; questions concerning national cultural identities; literature in the age of the media system; the politics of postmodernity and postcolonialism.  Readings may include authors such as Theodor W. Adorno, Jean Améry, Alfred Andersch, Ingeborg Bachmann, Gottfried Benn, Max Bense, Thomas Bernhard, Marcel Beyer, Peter Bichsel, Heinrich Böll, Wolfgang Borchert, Johannes Bobrowski, Bertolt Brecht, Hermann Burger, Rolf Dieter Brinkmann, Elias Canetti, Paul Celan, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Günter Eich, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Max Frisch, Eugen Gomringer, Günter Grass, Reinhard P. Gruber, Durs Grünbein, Jürgen Habermas, Peter Handke, Martin Heidegger, Helmut Heißenbüttel, Wolfgang Hildesheimer, Peter Huchel, Thomas Hürlimann, Ernst Jandl, Karl Jaspers, Elfriede Jelinek, Ernst Jünger, Wladimir Kaminer, Sarah Kirsch, Thomas Kling, Ruth Klüger, Alexander Kluge, Wolfgang Koeppen, Christian Kracht, Thomas Mann, Friederike Mayröcker, Niklaus Meienberg, Gerhard Meier, Robert Menasse, Heiner Müller, Herta Müller, Adolf Muschg, Hans Erich Nossack, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Oskar Pastior, Christoph Ransmayr, Arno Schmidt, Peter Schneider, W. G. Sebald, Verena Stefan, Botho Strauss, Marlene Streeruwitz, Yoko Tawada, Martin Walser, Peter Weiss, Urs Widmer, Christa Wolf, Feridun Zaimoglu.
 
GERST 6630 NIETZSCHE AND HEIDEGGER (also COML 6630)
4 credits.
    W 2:30-4:25, G. Waite
This graduate seminar provides a basic introduction to the thinking of Nietzsche and Heidegger, and to the latter’s interpretation and appropriation of the former. A major concern is the articulation of philosophy and politics, particularly in the case of Heidegger.  We are also interested in the types of argumentation and styles of writing of both thinkers, including in light of the hypothesis that they were working in the ancient tradition of prudent exotericism, viz. that they never wrote exactly what they thought and that they intended their influence to come slightly beneath the level of conscious apprehension.  We also consider their impact on the long list of intellectuals across the ‘Left-Center-Right’ spectrum, including (depending on seminar-participant interest): Adorno, Agamben, Bataille, Badiou, Bourdieu, Butler, Derrida, Deleuze, Foucault, Gadamer, Irigaray, Klossowski, Löwith, Marcuse, Rorty, Leo Strauss, Vattimo, Zupancic.  The readings are provided in German (and French or Italian in some cases) and in English translations, when these exist.  Discussion and papers in English.  Students from all disciplines are welcome.

GERST 7530 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1-4 credits.  Prerequisite: permission of instructor.  Hours to be arranged.
    Staff

GERST 7531 COLLOQUIUM
1-4 credits.
F 3:00-5:00, L. Adelson


 

Special Interest Courses for Graduate Students

GERST 4070 DEUTSCH ALS FREMDSPRACHE—TEACHING GERMAN AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE
4 credits.  Intended primarily for graduate students preparing to teach German.  
   TBA, G. Lischke

GERST 6310 READING ACADEMIC GERMAN I
3 credits.  Intended for graduate students with no prior experience in German.
    MWF 9:05-9:55
This course emphasizes the acquisition of reading skills in German, using a variety of prepared and authentic texts.  The follow-up course, GERST 6320, Reading Academic German II, is offered in the spring only.